Join Me at Join.Me


With the increase in technology devices in the classroom, what alternatives do teachers now have as far as displaying content?

Remember the overhead days?  I thought that the switch from that to a digital projector was a big deal but now that all of my students have mini, individual screens right in front of them, do I need one large projection in the front of the classroom.  What if I want to show content (a picture, file, presentation, map, etc.) and I want just want that shared with all my students?  What if I want them to see what I see on my computer screen?

I like the free-ness and the simplicity of Join.me.com  At Join.me, a teacher can download the software and be able to broadcast their computer screen to anyone that logs in with a passkey.  I run the software on my computer and the students go straight to https://join.me/.  They don’t have to log-in or download anything on their end; they just enter a code that I generate for my sharing time.  Once they enter that code, their computer screen turns into my computer screen.

The student (or the joiner) is just a vistor.  They cannot access or manipulate your screen without being granted access, so it’s safe.  The teacher can see who is all in the session and can see when anyone drops out.  There are some communication options too, where students can type in questions or answer your questions or have a complete discussion chat-room style while still viewing your screen.

There are some applications of this that are great but here is one important thing to remember:  there is about a 5 second lag between the real time on your screen and action that the students see.  I don’t see this as an ideal replacement for showing video or fast moving content.  But I think it’s great for pointing out or looking at stationary content for a little while.

Whenever the teacher ends the session, the code evaporates and all students are “dismissed” from the session and return to their originally scheduled programming.

Best Part:  Obviously it works through the Internet so it’s good on Chrome, Safari and Firefox, but there is also a free IPad app that lets IPad classrooms see a teacher’s computer screen.

IPad Integration: Apps with Multiple Classroom Options


Sometimes you find an app that will work great as either a small stand-alone activity or a game-changing classroom revolution – – all depending on how much you want to customize it and use it.  If you want to use the App as a filler activity, it could be.  If you wanted to make the App an individualized choice activity that students use to practice a concept, it could be.  If you wanted to use the App for specific students in enrichment and intervention activities, it could do that for you too.  If you wanted an App to totally revolutionize the way you gather data and build practice activities, it could do that.  The great things about these types of apps is that: 1) each student has a personal log-in so that each students experience on the app is personal, saved, customized and abled to be accessed again and again, 2) the teacher can include as much customization as he or she is comfortable with.

Edmodo  Free (App Store)

I’m a big fan of Edmodo as a classroom management portal.  It’s an easy way to send students links, files, notes, assignments and quizzes, and safely allows them to collaborate, write and share.  Students can log in and out of their individual Edmodo profile so that each individual user can access their individual Edmodo account.

Ideas for Edmodo Implementation in general:

  • Post a discussion prompt and have students respond to a question or share thoughts for everyone to see
  • Create an assignment in which students submit a private only-seen-by-the-teacher response
  • Post a class brainstorming session to generate writing ideas
  • Create formative assessments in the quiz module
  • “Exit Ticket” or “Elevator Speech” where students explain what they learned following a lesson or day
  • Post videos, notes or information for students that need extra review or were absent
  • Put links, documents or information there for students to easily access

Another great plus with Edmodo is its Apps (so, essentially, there are Apps within the App).  There are a lot of great ones – – some that you have to pay for and some free ones.  One really great literacy app is No Red Ink.  (Click here for a review on No Red Ink)  (There is also a internet site for No Red Ink that anyone can use through Safari).

ScootPad  Free (App Store)

I came across this App last week when a friend of mine was talking about how the students in her school can’t wait to use the IPads to review Math and Literacy games in order to earn coins and that their school earned more coins in the last two weeks than any other school in Iowa using the App.  Many parts of this looked intriguing, so I setup a teacher account on ScootPad posing as a 5th grade teacher.

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ScootPad has a teacher set-up page on the Internet at www.scootpad.com.  That is where I set-up my account, created a class and added my list of students.  I control the student usernames and passwords and can adjust and change them if needed.  I picked by grade level (5th grade) and then chose my standards.  ScootPad works with the Common Core and I chose to select all the Common Core standards for 5th grade.  These standards are now added to my class.

Option #1:  That’s the bare minimum of what is needed to work with ScootPad (setup a class, create student accounts, share account info with students).  At this point, your students can go to the ScootPad app on the IPad, log-in with their personal information and access grade level appropriate Math and Literacy practice activities.  These practice activities are randomly generated using the Common Core standards and over time also keep in mind the progress of the student, adjusting to their level of comprehension and understanding.  The students earn coins for each correct answer and bonus coins for 100% completion.  From what I can see, students can do as many practice activities as they want, whenever they want.

Option #2:  Teachers can log-in and monitor progress and student achievement.  Teachers can also assign practice activities to be completed.  These homework assignments can be assigned for every student or assigned to only those students in need of enrichment and intervention.  I like the results tracking feature in ScootPad because it breaks everything down by the standard.  The teacher can see the level of proficiency of their students in each standard area.  It’s a great tool for identification and intervention.

Option #3: The students have an individualized piggy bank that they store the coins that they earn for completing their activities.  Teachers (and parents!) can set-up classroom rewards that students can “purchase” with their coins.  You can also customized these and make them available for only a few students (for example, if you had a reward available only for those struggling students).  It’s a nice option and ScootPad is something parents can access also so that they can build rewards for their own students.

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Khan Academy  Internet

If you want your students to practice math problems by concept, there isn’t much of a comparison with Khan Academy.  It’s an internet based application that can be used through Safari on your IPad.  Students can practice the problems, get hints if they get stuck and watch tutorials and explanations if they need to.  If students created an account on Khan Academy and attach a teacher as a “coach”, the coach can see progress and get data.  But the activities still work well as review and practice activities even if they don’t log-in to an individual account.  But since that option is there, I include it here.

 

IPad Integration: Intro and Audiobooks


Basic Apps to Know:

Dropbox  Free (App Store)

Share information from your computer to your IPad by installing Dropbox on the Ipad (and possibly on your computer).  You can also access Dropbox on the Internet.  Great for sharing files (documents, PDFs, photos, videos, etc.)

IBooks  Free (App Store)

The standard reading platform on your IPad.  Reads document files you share through Dropbox, EPUB files you download from the internet and anything you purchase in the store.

Edmodo  Free (App Store)

I’m a big fan of Edmodo as a classroom management portal.  It’s an easy way to send students links, files, notes, assignments and quizzes, and safely allows them to collaborate, write and share.  Students can log in and out of their individual Edmodo profile so that each individual user can access their individual Edmodo account.

Another great plus with Edmodo is its Apps (so, essentially, there are Apps within the App).  There are a lot of great ones – – some that you have to pay for and some free ones.  One really great literacy app is No Red Ink.  (Click here for a review on No Red Ink)

I want my students to be able to read Audiobooks on the IPad.

IBooks  Free (App Store)

It isn’t an audiobook platform by nature, but IBooks includes a feature where you can highlight text and have the computer voice speak it to you.  Simply double click the text, highlight to portion you would like spoken and hit the “Speak” option.

AudioBooks  Basic Version, Free; Full Version, $.99 (App Store)

Over 5,000 public domain works are available directly in the app. Audio books are streamed directly within the app and can be downloaded to an in-app library as well. The audio book will also continue to be read when running in the background, allowing a user to take notes in another app while listening to the audio. The free version gives you access to all books in the public domain. Purchasing the premium version of the app opens up access to additional content.

LibriVox  Free (Online Website)

Though not an app, Librivox is a web site of thousands of public domain recordings that can be downloaded and then played via iTunes on the iPad. In addition to providing the full recording, Librivox also allows for downloading books in smaller segments and posts additional resources about each title such as a book summary, a link to a Gutenberg e-text, and references to related Wikipedia articles.

Project Gutenberg  Free (Online Website)

With over 40,000 public domain titles available on the site as ePub files, students and teachers can directly download files to iBooks for offline reading. Once the book is in the iBooks app, the text can be read back by turning on Speak Selection in the iPad accessibility settings.

OverDrive Media Console  Free (App Store)

With a valid library card, download eBooks and audio books from the library. Browse from the titles available through public and university libraries. Much like physical library books, these titles are borrowed and then returned. At the end of the lending period, they simply disappear from the app. Both eBooks and audio books are “read” through the Overdrive app and cannot be transferred to iBooks for annotation purposes.

Itunes  (prices for titles vary)

Also check out the selection of audiobooks available for purchase through ITunes.