Problem Attic


The state of New York routinely gives high school regents exams.  Like our Iowa Assessments, I presume.  What if there was a place online that contained every exam and every individual question from these exams, categorized by each topic or concept?  And teachers could use those questions to build their own tests?

Welcome toProblem Attic!

Problem Attic has thousands of questions for Math, Science, Social Studies and Language Arts from the New York Regents Exam.  It’s more at the secondary level (def. not elementary).  Teachers use these questions to build their own exams and activities.

The first thing you do is create a blank document.  I decided to make a pretend test.  There are over 9,500 math questions.  Then I saw there were 22,000 science questions.  I was amazed by the inclusion of drawings and diagrams, so I picked some of them too.  I noticed that while most of the questions are multiple choice, some are essay, short answer type questions.  Makes for a nice variety.  The Language Arts sections are accompanied by reading passages and questions.

After picking all your questions, you can decide how you want to print.  They even include nice options like making each question a flashcard for activities or ACT test prep rather than just a standard test.

HIGHLY recommended that you check this out (especially for ACT Prep)

Random Name Generator


Over the weekend I came across this website that I thought I would pass along.  It’s called a Random Name Generator, (http://www.superteachertools.com/instantclassroom/random-name-generator.php) but it actually does a lot more. Teachers can create an account, put in their class lists, and use the website to:

Screen Shot 2012-09-03 at 8.12.12 PM 1) Randomly call on a student:  This is like having popsicle sticks or some other random method of calling on students, only techy.  And it works great with a SmartBoard.

2) Create random groups:  The site takes your class lists and randomly groups them together.  You tell it the number you would like to have per group.

3) Seating Chart: Let’s face it, JMC (our current SMS) is pretty ugly.  I have seats in pods now, and JMC just doesn’t work for me like that.  It isn’t the greatest, but it does let me move the desks around the way I want.  You can print them – – and even add photos so that you could print a photo seating chart for a sub.  Simple and not flashy, but do-able.

TestMoz: Online Test Generator


Here are some things I like about student review activities (prior to a big test):

  1. a grade-able quiz where I author the questions
  2. question and answer variability so that students can take the quiz more than once for review
  3. quizzes that give immediate feedback so that students can assess their readiness or competency
  4. easy online access without student username/password sign-in features
  5. easy to access quiz results that make for easy grade recording
  6. free (probably should have put this at #1)

About two years ago, I found a great downloadable quiz generator program called Quiz Creator from Wondershare.  I downloaded the quiz editing software, created unique and special quizzes and was able to publish them as embeddable flash files that I could upload to my class website.  The kids just had to put in their first name and last name and when they finished, the results were emailed to me.  Pretty awesome.  But early on in this quiz creation romance I knew we would have problems.  The software was only available for PC.  And even if I found some compatible Mac software, I would have had some problems getting the privileges to install a program on my school Mac computer.  Doing the quiz writing from home was not ideal, but I lived with it.  Then we changed school website servers and I found that I couldn’t take the PC created flash files and transfer them over to my IWeb website.  With no way to get these quizzes online so my students could take them, I needed a new quiz creator.

Into my life walked www.testmoz.com.  It’s a very simple online generator created by an undergraduate student at Washington State University.  TestMoz allows you to create quizzes online by simply giving a test a name and an administrator password so that you can access the quiz and edit it later.  You can make fill in the blank, multiple choice, multiple response or true/false questions.

You can choose for the question order to be random and you can also choose for the multiple choice answers to be randomized too.  Students have to type in their name before taking each quiz: no sign-up or anything.  All results are stored on TestMoz where I can access them later with my admin password.  It’s so clean and simple and it seems a little too clean and simple, but I really love it.  The flash based quizzes I used in the past were a little more jazzy and then just showed one question at a time, where these quizzes show all the questions at once.

Like I said earlier, I like to use these kinds of tests as review before a big test, where students can repeatedly go over the questions so that they are comfortable with the material and concepts that will be on the actual test.  Students can retake the quiz and, although they are getting the same questions, there is enough variability that they still have to think a little bit.  (Also, if I don’t want to allow the students to take it more than once and they do, I’ll just take the first score submitted by looking at the timestamp that accompanies the results.)

TestMoz seems to fulfill my wish list above for things that I’m looking for in an online quiz that my students can use for review.  Do I wish it was a little more flashy or pretty?  Of course, I’m a girl.  But as an educator strictly focused on outcomes, it’s a match made in online test generator heaven.