Google Tools to Assess and Provide Feedback


Since making the shift to standards based grading, I’ve wanted to make sure I communicate expectations and give feedback that fosters growth. My goal is to move students along on the path to proficiency. With each assessment, I want to show students what proficiency looks like and provide them a pathway to advancement.

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Google Form with checkboxes of assessment criteria and checkboxes for feedback. 

Recently I had presentational assessments in Spanish 2 and decided to build a Google Form to organize data. The Form had checkboxes related to our specific proficiency standard criteria. Then I included some feedback checkboxes and an open place for me to write comments too. I filled out a form for each student while assessing.

 

So then I had a Google Sheet of data. Cool. How could I get this and deliver this to my students? I tried about 5 different tools and then finally fell in tech-love with a Google Sheet add-on called formMule.

 

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Google Sheet of data from Google Form.

In order to get this data to the students, I needed to copy in their emails into the sheet (using an easy alphabetic sort copy and paste).

The add-on formMule will send a template email using the data in a Google Sheet.

 

 

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The formMule email template

The add-on walks you through the process nicely. I created a template for the email I wanted sent to the students. It uses the merge tags from the Google Sheet and I just placed the info in there the way that I wanted.

When I clicked send, I wasn’t 100% sure what was going to happen. But the emails went through and they looked exactly like what I wanted. I was happy to get the feedback back to the students in digital form. (I was even happier when a student validated me later that day.)

 

 

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Interactive Google Slides as Hyperdoc


Recently Kristine Keefe wrote a guest blog on Maris Hawkin’s site about the amazing uses of Google in the classroom. It really got me excited about the possibilities with assessments and different visual activities that are possible by integrating Google Drawings and Google Slides into the classroom.

Typically when I create a Hyperdoc, I use just a Google Doc and include hyperlink or embedded activity elements. For an upcoming Hyperdoc I created to review different tenses and information from the beginning episodes of Internado, I decided to make a Google Slides Hyperdoc.

One thing I already like about the Google Slides Hyperdoc vs. my traditional Google Doc is that it is easy to organize and navigate. I can easily flip to the slide that I want to see—AND the information is visible at a quick glance in the sidebar view. I can easily see if students skipped any steps without having to scroll through a 3 page doc. With Google Slides, I have some added design elements that I enjoyed playing with too. I could color code different sections and create some cohesiveness with design and organization that is not possible with a Google Doc.

The best part about Kristine’s suggestions and using Google Slides is that you can easily create drag and drop elements for interactive opportunities. I used to be able to do this by inserting a Google Drawing into a Google Doc, but it’s so much easier and more intuitive with a Google Slide.  I can create activities where students drag colored text boxes that look like buttons. There is something engaging about dragging and dropping vs. typing answers that gives Hyperdocs a nice element.

Here is a copy of my Internado Tense Review Hyperdoc. It is based on information from Season 1 Episodes 1-4.

In the coming weeks I plan on making listening assessments and reading assessments with Google Docs. If you are interested, check back here and I might do a write up on those.

Choose Your Own Adventure in Google Forms


Google Forms: Branching Multiple Choice Questions
Google Forms: Branching Multiple Choice Questions

Remember Choose Your Own Adventure Books or Games?  A new feature in Google Forms now lets users branch multiple choice responses so that each response leads you to a different page.  There are many potential applications for this in the classroom, but branching allows someone to craft a Choose Your Own Adventure story.

When drafting a Google Form, the creator can write part of a story in the “Page Description” box.  Underneath that text block, the reader can be given selection of choices.  Each of these selections give the reader the option to choose what will happen next in the story.  By checking the option “Go to page based on answer”, the creator can decide where each possible answer leads.

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Because the Google Form makes the creation of a Choose Your Own Adventure Story very methodical, its necessary to plan out all of your options and where they might lead.  I attempted to try this by creating a CYOA activity associated with a movie that we watch in class called ‘El Norte’.  I thought that this activity might be a good thing to do before we watch the film.  Anyway, as I started to mind-map my story and all the possible options, it easily got out of hand and complicated.  These webs can get quite complex if you want them to.  I would suggest that beginners limit themselves to only a few layers of options.  My CYOA story required 25 pages in a Google Form and I tried to be conservative in the last few layers.

There are a lot of concluding activities that could accompany this type of activity: a discussion, written essays, going through it until you get a desirable outcome, etc.  I think the educational impact of this could be great:  making the student think about choices and consequences and what actions lead to different situations.  I saw a lot of this application in Social Studies but think that it could be stretched to any discipline.

One thing that excites me about the ease of the Google Doc format is the fact that students could be writers of their own CYOA story.  What a great activity!  Make students draft out a series of choices and possible outcomes and put together an activity they can share with classmates.  They could examine the choices made by Romeo & Juliet, or John Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis, or a scientist working through a hypothesis.  Just as in a Choose Your Own Adventure story – – the possibilities are endless!

My Choose Your Own Adventure Activity: El Norte

Make a Quiz on Google Docs


Google Docs is a program provided by Google that I have used in the past as a nice filing cabinet for documents. I used to always lose my thumb drive and I have learned to love uploading files to Google Docs.

Recently I stumbled across the Form feature in Google Docs, where you can produce a form and save it online. I had never thought about using a form as a quiz template but it appears as if this will be a great tool.

Using this feature, you can create questions in which a student has to input their individual answers (multiple formats, such as fill in the blank and multiple choice). Once the students have finished filling in the form/quiz and click “submit”, Google Docs transfers all of the information to a spreadsheet (on Google Docs) for you. Although this application does not correct any of the answers, it is a pretty handy, online way of having students answer questions and submitting them online. Be sure to include a mandatory question where the students have to type their name so that you know who did what 🙂

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