Kahoot!


Recently a tech colleague passed along a great free online resource to use for formative assessment and classroom activities.  I’ve done little quiz games or review games in the past using online resources like Socrative, but this one has a new twist.  The website is called Kahoot.

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Kahoot reminded my students a lot of the quiz games played in restaurants like Buffalo Wild Wings.  A question is displayed on the front board and each student selects an answer to that question from their personal device.  (I’ve had students use computers, IPads, Kindles or phones for this activity).  If you get the question correct, you get points.  If you answer faster, you get more points.  After each question, the student sees their ranking on a leaderboard.  It’s a lot of fun and provides great motivation for the students.

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Teachers can create “Kahoots” from getkahoot.com.  It gives you the option of creating quizzes, discussions or surveys.  Right now I’m only using the quizzes.  The teacher creates multiple choice quizzes and has the option of adding in pictures and video in the questions too.  After a Kahoot is made, you are ready to share it with the students.

The students just go to kahoot.it.  From there they will type in a pin code that is assigned to the Kahoot the teacher is running.  The quiz is teacher paced, meaning that the questions only appear when the teacher is ready.  Once ready, the teacher shows the students the question on the board.  After 5 seconds, answer choices also appear on the board.  Each answer choice is color coded.  On the student’s individual device, they see the color coded choices but no words—they have to look up at the board for the question and the answer choices.  They select the color associated with the choice they think is correct.  Once all students have answered, they find out how many points they earned (if any) and what their ranking is in the leaderboard.  At the end of playing a Kahoot, the teacher can download the results, which gives you question by question analysis of how students did and you can easily see questions that were the most problematic.

We loved using Kahoot and now I’m just under pressure to create more Kahoots for us to do in class!

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Socrative


Socrative is a great online resource for teachers that want to do quick, formative assessment or informal checks on learning.  Teachers can create a teacher account that works like an online “classroom”.  Students go to that online classroom to participate in any activities the teacher makes active.  Here is a list of some of the things a teacher can do using Socrative:

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This is biggest thing that Socrative can do.  Teachers create multiple choice, true false quizzes using Socrative and invite the students to their classroom to take the quiz.  You can choose between student paced quizzes, where the students cycle through the quiz questions at their own pace, or teacher paced quizzes, where the teacher controls when the next quiz question will be displayed.  I like to use these quizzes as informative formative assessments.  I check for understanding, analyze the results for patterns, and determine whether or not we are ready to move on to the next concept.

Exit Ticket

This is a great way to do a formative assessment.  Students can type in their own words, answer specific questions or give just a general reflection on the lesson of the day.  The teacher can craft these to narrow the scope, but I usually just have a couple open ended questions that I use to get information from the student.

Space Race

It isn’t a perfect game, but Space Race takes any quiz a teacher has created and makes it a game where spaceships fly across the screen with every correct answer.  The objective is to be the first spaceship across.  The thing my students have enjoyed about SpaceRace is the random grouping feature.  I will set it to randomly group the students into 6 or 7 different groups, each assigned a specific color.  Then, once the quiz begins, they know their color and always call out “Who else is Purple?”.  They are cycling through the same old quiz questions, but wrapping it up in a game makes it a lot more fun for the students.

 

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Results:

Results for all activities on Socrative are stored on the website and can be automatically emailed to you.  The emailed results show each response and totals up the number correct too.

How to use it:

Students can access Socrative on the web or through the Socrative App that is available at the Apple ITunes Store.  In the past, I’ve had students download the app to their phone or Ipod and they seemed to like that.  Today, I just have my students go to www.socrative.com, enter the student portal and enter my personal Socrative classroom number.