Google Tools to Assess and Provide Feedback


Since making the shift to standards based grading, I’ve wanted to make sure I communicate expectations and give feedback that fosters growth. My goal is to move students along on the path to proficiency. With each assessment, I want to show students what proficiency looks like and provide them a pathway to advancement.

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Google Form with checkboxes of assessment criteria and checkboxes for feedback. 

Recently I had presentational assessments in Spanish 2 and decided to build a Google Form to organize data. The Form had checkboxes related to our specific proficiency standard criteria. Then I included some feedback checkboxes and an open place for me to write comments too. I filled out a form for each student while assessing.

 

So then I had a Google Sheet of data. Cool. How could I get this and deliver this to my students? I tried about 5 different tools and then finally fell in tech-love with a Google Sheet add-on called formMule.

 

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Google Sheet of data from Google Form.

In order to get this data to the students, I needed to copy in their emails into the sheet (using an easy alphabetic sort copy and paste).

The add-on formMule will send a template email using the data in a Google Sheet.

 

 

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The formMule email template

The add-on walks you through the process nicely. I created a template for the email I wanted sent to the students. It uses the merge tags from the Google Sheet and I just placed the info in there the way that I wanted.

When I clicked send, I wasn’t 100% sure what was going to happen. But the emails went through and they looked exactly like what I wanted. I was happy to get the feedback back to the students in digital form. (I was even happier when a student validated me later that day.)

 

 

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Redesigned Syllabus for 2017-2018


Each year I tinker and improve the class syllabus I give to my Spanish students. I’ve gone extremely detailed and very visual. This year I’ve really focused on: What is the information I need to make sure my students and parents know?

During the last school year I made a change to standards based grading on a 4 point scale. I communicated expectations and explained that to everyone last year but felt that same information was worth clarifying in this year’s syllabus as well.

This year’s version of my syllabus was created on Canva. I like the way that it looks and the practicality of being able to download it as a PDF. Makes it easy to send and easy to print if need be. It’s not as flashy or interactive as my Thinglink syllabus of 2015 but I’m ok with that. After the first day, I’m quite certain no one went back to those Thinglink links anyway.

The key to creating any syllabus is being very clear about your course and your expectations. Does anyone else love redesigning syllabi as much as me?